Monthly Archives: October 2018

Dr. Hildy®- #4 -‘Spooky’ – with Screenwriter Eric Ernst – HOLLYWOOD goes HALLOWEEN!!!

Happy Halloween

from One Cell One Light Radio!

WE HAVE A WINNER!  Kathleen, Rochester, NY

(***Be sure to see the Special Halloween Prize offer below the text,
and call-in or email your answer to the question. First CALL or Email wins!) 

This week on the show, Dr. Hildy™ welcomes screenwriter Eric Ernst for a very special Halloween discussion of the most frightening of all movie genres – HORROR! 

HORROR of HORRORS!

                                    HORROR of HORRORS!

(TOO HORROR-ABLE)

Dr. Hildy® Welcomes Screenwriter Eric Ernst

HOLLYWOOD GOES HALLOWEEN!!!

Re-Visiting Wednesday, October 31, 2012 

HOUR 1 AUDIO: 

Often unsettling, horrifying, and intense, horror films are designed to terrify, cause dread and alarm, and to invoke our hidden worst fears all while safely entertaining us in a cathartic experience. Horror films center on the dark side of life; the forbidden, strange and alarming events that we only want to experience vicariously through the characters onscreen.

The horror genre has existed since the very beginning of cinema. In 1896, French visionary Georges Melies directed the two minute short Le Manoir Du Diable (aka The Devil’s Castle/The Haunted Castle) – containing familiar elements of later horror and vampire films: a flying bat, a medieval castle, a cauldron, a demon figure (Mephistopheles), and skeletons, ghosts, and witches – and a crucifix to dispatch with evil.

A hallmark of the genre is the vampire film, the first of which was F.W. Murnau’s silent masterpiece Nosferatu (1922), turning the title character from Bram Stokers famous novel into a hideous monster. Capitalizing on the growing demand for these films, Universal Studios released in 1923 The Hunchback of Notre Dame, starring Lon Chaney.

This was the beginning of what would become the most success any studio has had with the genre, as Universal went on to make Dracula, Frankenstein, The Mummy, The Invisible Man, Bride of Frankenstein, The Wolf Man, The Creature From the Black Lagoon and countless others through the 1930’s, 40’s and 50’s. In 1948, Universal released the comedy film Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein, which is considered to have effectively ended the golden age of classic horror monsters, despite being a huge box office success.

While Universal would not revive their classic monsters until 1999, with a remake of The Mummy starring Brendan Fraser and Rachel Weisz, the 1950’s gave way to a new style of horror, one inspired by the Cold War-era nuclear paranoia of the time. Paramount’s The Blob is a famous example, about an alien lifeform that consumes everything in its path. Another example of this genre is Them!, a film about ants turning into giant killing machines in the wake of a nuclear explosion.

In 1968, director George A. Romero ushered in one of the most popular sub-genres in horror, the modern zombie film, with Night of the Living Dead. This trope has been done time and time again, with Romero himself making 6 films in the series, and is enjoying popular success on television with AMC’s The Walking Dead.

In the 1970’s, the slasher film was born, with The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, a film that is still unsettling to watch to this day and Halloween, which started the long series of horror films continued with Nightmare on Elm Street and Friday the 13th, whose main killer characters met in 2003 with Freddy vs. Jason.

Today the horror genre is alive and well, with many directors going an independent route, abandoning the hoop-jumping that comes with studio pictures. Films such as Paranormal Activity, Saw, V/H/S and Insidious take advantage of the lowered cost that digital filmmaking allows for to provide a new type of scary movie. And there’s still scary movies that are safe for all ages, with Hotel Transylvania, Tim Burton’s Frankenweenie and director Joe Johnston’s The Hole.

Join Dr. Hildy and her guest, screenwriter Eric Ernst, this week as they discuss horror films past and present on One Cell One Light Radio!

~!~!~!~!~!~!~!~!~!~!~!~

A  SPECIAL Halloween TREAT Prize – 
**10/24/18 -WE HAVE A WINNER!  Kathleen, Rochester, NY**
Movie DVDs of Abbott and Costello – Creature from the Black Lagoon and Dr. Hildy’s Baci Mi gels of Asian Tributes (4 gels). My Sweet Honey Bee Soap and an Essential Oil kit of Lemon, Peppermint and Lavender
.
***QUESTION for today’s prize: Name one of the other Universal Monster Characters like the Creature from the Black Lagoon that were featured in other Abbott and Costello movies.

PHONE and Leave a message with your answer. Phone:  323-466-2599  or email Dr. Hildy directly at ihs-drhildy@sbcglobal.net

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DR. HILDY’S FAVORITES:
**Dracula–all of them, but Bela Lugosi is the best – HS**

Draculas

Dracula – (1931) Trailer – YouTube
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Nfmh178L98

Dracula – (2000) Trailer – YouTube
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k7leC4YClrI

Dracula – Trailer – YouTube
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k7leC4YClrI

Dracula 3D Official Trailer #1 (2012) – Dario Argento, Rutger Hauer
Move HD – YouTube
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SfzwSfDXnAE

Wolfman

Wolfman – (1941) Lon Channey, Jr
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0034398/ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y52scIWn2Rc

The Mummy

The Mummy – Boris Karloff
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1i6xNScZRP4

Frankenstein

Frankenstein

Frankenstein – Boris Karloff
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bKyiXjyVsfw

Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein

Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein

Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein – Bud Abbott and Lou Costello http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gg5N9FJc__Q

Legend Of Sleepy Hollow

Legend Of Sleepy Hollow

Legend of Sleepy Hallow Disney and Johnney Depp verson)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6O4Himch7g

Hunchback Of Notre Dame

Hunchback Of Notre Dame

HunchBack of Notre Dame (Charles Laughton & Maureen O’Hara) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PxWoOQt7dLw

The Raven

The Raven

The Raven (Vincent Price)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uy3ktfRztss

The House Of Wax

The House Of Wax

The House of Wax (Vincent Price)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JH37kwhIlnc

Hotel Transylvania

Hotel Transylvania

Hotel Transylvania (Adam Sandler)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xkRT21JOF74

AND THE ‘SCARIEST’ and the ‘BEST’ favorites’ list from our Professional Screenwriter and our own Staff Promotional Writer, Eric Ernst:

Paranormal Activity

Paranormal Activity

Paranormal Activity – The scariest film I have ever seen, hands down.
Just unsettling. (Trailer)
http://www.paranormalmovie.com/
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OHy6wrJco1Q

Shaun Of The Dead

Shaun Of The Dead

Shaun of the Dead – Although mostly a comedy, the film truly
does justice to the horror genre, becoming terrifying when it needs to. (Trailer)
http://www.universalstudiosentertainment.com/shaun-of-the-dead/ http://video.universalstudiosentertainment.com/index.php/blu-ray/shaun-of-the-dead/v13214092

Night Of The Living Dead

Night Of The Living Dead

Night of the Living Dead – I always love the apocalyptic disaster that ensues in most zombie movies. The breakdown of society is terrifying to me. (Trailer) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Night_of_the_Living_Dead http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vEVjoAwC-3Q

Texas Chainsaw Massacre

Texas Chainsaw Massacre

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre – A classic. Disgusting and still unsettling.
The original is the only one worth watching, though. (Trailer)
http://www.thetexaschainsawmassacre.net/
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lh8VDffpM30

Alien

Alien

Alien – The “10 Little Indians” trope in space. Great movie and still scary. (Trailer) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LjLamj-b0I8

Dawn Of The Dead

Dawn Of The Dead

Dawn of the Dead (2004 version) – Haven’t seen the original, but the remake does a great job of modernizing the genre and creating a realistic disaster. (Trailer)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PpuNE1cX03c

[REC]

[REC]

[REC] – A Spanish entry in the “found footage” genre, this was remade in the US as Quarantine, but the original, about a group of people trapped in an apartment building
while an epidemic breaks out, is horrifying. (Trailer)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1038988/
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OeaUokzE9fI

The Blair Witch

The Blair Witch

The Blair Witch Project – The originator of the “found footage” genre,
this was the scariest film I had ever seen until Paranormal Activity. (Trailer)
http://www.blairwitch.com/
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a_Hw4bAUj8A

The Sentinel

The Sentinel

The Sentinel – A 1977 film about a woman living in a New York apartment where
not everything is as it seems. (Trailer)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YMIssiMkt04

The Attic Door

The Attic Door

The Attic Door – For obvious reasons = (Trailer)
http://www.theatticdoormovie.com/
http://vimeo.com/6615810

Dr. Hildy welcomes THE ATTIC DOOR
MovieWriter/Director Danny Daneau, Executive Producer Erica Harrell and Writer/Co-Producer Eric Ernst
https://onecellonelightradio.wordpress.com/2011/09/02/september-7-2011-the-attic-door-movie-and-chac-mool-natural-minerals-and-medicinal-plants-of-mesoamerica/

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Dr. Hildy®- #3 – ‘Spooky’ – with Screenwriter Eric Ernst – HISTORY OF HALLOWEEN

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OneCellOneLight® Radio | Blog Talk Radio
Re-visiting Wednesday, October 30, 2013

    Conte Rossi and Empress of the Dragon

ONE HOUR AUDIO:

z1 - ericOver the last few decades, Halloween has grown from a night centered around children trick or treating, to a multi-billion dollar industry. Costumes, décor, parties, haunted house events – all have made the Halloween season the unofficial kickoff to the end-of-year holidays. But like most traditions, its original meaning has been lost throughout the years.

This week on One Cell One Light Radio, Dr. Hildy hosts a discussion on the origins of Halloween with Screenwriter, Eric Ernst. Today’s Halloween customs are thought to have been influenced by folk customs and beliefs from the Celtic-speaking countries, some of which have pagan roots, and others that may be rooted in Celtic Christianity.

b - Samhain(click on image to enlarge)

Samhain was the first and most important of the four quarter-days in the medieval Gaelic calendar and was celebrated in Ireland, Scotland, and the Isle of Man on or about October 31 and kindred festivals were held at the same time of year by the Brittonic Celts.

Samhain marked the end of the harvest season and beginning of winter or the ‘darker half’ of the year. It was seen as a liminal time, when the spirits or fairies (the Aos Sí) could more easily come into our world and were particularly active. At Samhain, it was believed that the Aos Sí needed to be propitiated to ensure that the people and their livestock survived the winter. Offerings of food and drink were left for the Aos Sí and the souls of the dead were also said to revisit their homes. Places were set at the dinner table or by the fire to welcome them. In 19th century Ireland, candles would be lit and prayers formally offered for the souls of the dead. After this the eating, drinking, and games would begin. The household festivities included rituals and games intended to divine one’s future, especially regarding death and marriage.

Today’s Halloween customs are also influenced by Christian dogma and practices derived from it. Halloween falls on the evening before the Christian holy day of All Hallows’ Day, thus giving the holiday the full name of All Hallows’ Eve. But it was not until the mass Irish and Scottish immigration during the 19th century that it was brought to North America. Confined to the immigrant communities during the mid-19th century, it was gradually assimilated into mainstream society and by the first decade of the 20th century it was being celebrated coast to coast by people of all social, racial and religious backgrounds.

As for the many traditions of Halloween, in Ireland and Scotland, the turnip has traditionally been carved during Halloween, but immigrants to North America used the native pumpkin, which is both much softer and much larger – making it easier to carve than a turnip. In Scotland and Ireland, guising – children disguised in costume going from door to door for food or coins  – is a traditional Halloween custom, and is recorded in Scotland at Halloween in 1895 where masqueraders in disguise carrying lanterns made out of scooped out turnips, visit homes to be rewarded with cakes, fruit and money.

Halloween costumes are traditionally modeled after supernatural figures such as vampires, monsters, ghosts, skeletons, witches, and devils. In Hallowed Be Thy Name, a religious perspective to the wearing of costumes is offered:”By dressing up in costumes and portraying frightening creatures, who at one time caused us to fear and tremble, we. . . are poking fun at the serpent whose head has been crushed by our Savior.” Furthermore, in the Christian tradition, “images of skeletons, ghosts, graveyard scenes, nighttime creatures such as bats are traditional decorations. Over time, in the United States the costume selection extended to include popular characters from fiction, celebrities, and generic archetypes such as ninjas and princesses.
Join Dr. Hildy and Eric Ernst, as they discuss the History of Halloween on One Cell One Light Radio!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halloween

Halloween’s Celtic Roots – Archaeology Magazine
http://archive.archaeology.org/online/interviews/butler.html  – Exploring how the past and present mix in the night of costumes and jack o’ lanterns.

The Origins of Halloween and its Bizarre Traditions

Dr. Hildy®-#2 – October Holiday ‘Spooky’- HE CAME HOME – A Halloween Short Film

Hello Everyone,

I would like you to spread this you tube out  on social media, etc., as you can.  The actress in the little clip 
HE CAME HOME – A HALLOWEEN SHORT FILM is Alex Arthur.  She is a remarkable actress and a client of IHS’s.  So lets see how we can help her to get the word out. 

Thank you!   Dr. Hildy

Here it’s is!!!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vDMJEoM3TgQ&t=26s

Director: Anthony Knasas

 

Dr. Hildy® – #1 – October Holiday ‘Spooky’ – ‘The Attic Door’ –

The Attic Door

The Attic Door

The first hour of One Cell One Light™ Radio will feature Dr. Staninger talking with the filmmakers behind the movie, ‘The Attic Door’.

 

Filmed in Utah for a budget of less than a quarter-million dollars, The Attic Door tells the story of a young brother and sister are abandoned in the vast and lonely landscape of the 19th century American West. Each day, they struggle to keep up the family farm, anxiously waiting for their parents to return. With nowhere to escape, the two siblings are about to discover that they are not entirely alone. As much as they try to deny the truth, something behind the attic door has awakened and they must now face their greatest fear. The Attic Door is the story of love, loss, loneliness, and the truth behind childhood fears.

Joining Dr. Staninger for this discussion will be Writer/Director Danny Daneau, Executive Producer Erica Harrell and Writer/Co-Producer Eric Ernst, with a focus on the process and struggles of making their film, and independently produced films in general. 

HOUR 1 AUDIO:

One Cell One Light®Radio

with Dr. Hildegarde Staninger®, RIET-1

One Cell One Light

with Dr. Hildegarde Staninger™, RIET-1

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